Summary: Join us this week as we celebrate the 100th episode of Tomorrow’s Leader. We talk about how Tomorrow’s Leader came to fruition, the struggles that lead the way, and giant leaps of faith and how they can change your life for the better! 

John (Intro): 

I have been on a quest to learn everything I can about leadership obsessed with what makes the best leaders so good. After running companies small and large for the last 20 years, today I speak onstages all across the world to audiences who are interested in that same question. My name is John Laurito and I'm your host. I invite you to join me on this journey as we explore this topic: What makes the best leaders so good? Welcome to Tomorrow’s Leader

John: 

Alright, welcome to today's episode of Tomorrow's Leader where we dive deep on all things leader related, related to leading yourself and leading others. I'm John Laurito, your host of this very special episode. If you have not already taken notice and your eyes just widened because you looked at the title and saw that we are at episode number 100! yes 100! Wow! I guess it’s been six months. We hit 100 episodes. 8 months ago, maybe 10 months ago even, I didn’t even know I was going to be doing this so crazy. Life Changes fast and we're to be talking a little bit or a lot about that today. It's interesting a friend of mine, Kevin, who produces this show for me, was telling me that like an incredibly small percentage of podcasts make it to episode 100. Actually the number on average is 7 episodes for every launched podcast, most of them never make it past 7. That's a big number. Like .001% make it to episode 100, okay? Maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration, maybe it’s not. I think it's probably pretty accurate so here's some other interesting stats if you're curious to know what's going on in the podcast World. There are people that collect stats and produce these numbers here because I don't know, I don't know who's listening. I don't know who, how long you tune in. I don't know how many shows you listen to on average per week. I don't know, when you do start a show do you finish? Like I said who knows? There's a whole bunch more people that are trying to figure that out. You’ll be happy to know that just because you are a listener to podcasts, you are smart. Or as they say in Boston you are “smaht”. You’re one of them “smaht” people. so on average smart people listen to podcasts. It makes you smarter on average. 

John: 

I have some other interesting stats. 51% of bottled water households are podcast listeners. I have no idea why that's important, but for those 49% of you that don't have bottled water, I'm assuming that, or 49% of you that have bottled water, that don't listen. I don't know if it's the bottled water that causes you to listen or not. I don't know what the correlation is but that is a 

stat. If you don't drink water like me, I have a tough time but you drink juice, 56% of juice households are podcast fans. If you like beer, 53% of beer households are podcast listeners.

So anyway, I was just floored and amazed by those stats. There’s a whole bunch of other ones that are really not important. The main stat is we are at episode number 100 and closing in very quickly on overtaking The Joe Rogan podcast. 

John: 

Give me a few years, we’ll be there. So I hope you enjoy these episodes. I really really appreciate you and value you and I'm very grateful for your listenership, if that is the word, and I very much appreciate all your feedback and your comments. I'll be honest with you, talking to a camera into a microphone is not a whole lot of direct feedback. It's not like speaking to a live audience. you have no idea. I don't know how these resonate with you, if you like them, what you like in particular, what you don't. I just tend to come up with ideas and thoughts and things that I think are going to be valuable and many of you have taken it upon yourself to let me know that you liked it and we continue and I appreciate that because it’s great to get feedback. So ,as always, I appreciate your ideas on things whether they’re personal issues you're having, and leadership or leading yourself or leading your company. I love to bring those types of things to the show and share them with the audience. 

John: 

So today in honor of the hundredth episode, I thought I would just share more specifically about my story, because it has been a really cool experience and absolutely unbelievable the last 9 months. I never thought in 9 months so much could happen. Some of that was planned, some of it was totally unplanned, but I thought I'd just take you through what got me to this point. To 100 episodes. A year ago, I don't think I would have even thought of doing a podcast. And my world has been much bigger than doing podcasts. I love this but I just wanted to share my story and kind of what went into all my life changes over this past year. So as many of you know, I was in leadership and I have been over the past 20 years running different organizations and financial services. When I was given my first opportunity back in 2002, that was to run an office. it was ranked way at the bottom in the national rankings, 100 out of 110. I figured, “Okay, I want to take over that.” There was nowhere to go but up and that's how you really figure out and learn leadership, and you had to cut your teeth and it was an incredible experience. I worked with some phenomenal leaders and built what was a very successful winning organization. we went from number 102 to number one in the country. And I learned a lot of what to do, in a lot of what not to do. And what is most important is the right people around you. When you have great people together, even if the strategy is a little bit off,great people figure out how to do fantastic things, and that's exactly what I learned. The importance of hiring and building a team around the right people. 

John: 

I was fortunate enough to get a number of other opportunities for leading offices up in Boston, the largest office for Ameriprise, for a few years. Met a whole bunch of other incredible people and I've been influenced by tremendous people. Larry Post, one of the first guests on this podcast who's been instrumental in my leadership career. I also had an opportunity to mentor and develop a lot of people in that time. And then my travels took me down to DC and I ran a region down there for Ameriprise for 3 years. the DC, Maryland,

Virginia region and that also was a turnaround, taking that from I think it was at the last rank, or close to last ranked, in the country and we brought it up as high as number three in the country. Then I got a great opportunity to work with Penn Mutual and take over their agency up there in Boston, back up to Boston. And that was when I got there ranked dead last in the country. I think it was 24 out of 24 or 26 out of 26, and brought it up as high as getting the President's award twice, which is the second. The Chairman's is number one. Never got to that but we came with the second award which was the President's award a couple years and the third that was Excellence award. That was for three years so we did some phenomenal things. Again, it's all about bringing the right people together. 

John: 

So what does that have to do with where I am? Well, I figured out a lot of cool things about leadership. I learned a lot and I figured out how to turn organizations around, and I've always had a desire to help other leaders and other organizations, even outside of the financial services industry, do that same thing and really develop leadership skills. I've always had this really fascinating ,like, obsession almost for leadership. I've read tons and tons and tons of books on leadership, but you know, one of things I always have felt after I read a book on leadership is, “Okay?” I love to devour any kind of leadership book, but a lot of times I came out of there with a really cool concept, but I didn't know what to do with it. It was kind of like, “Okay, well now what?” So a lot of what I started to think about was, “Okay, can you kind of build a recipe and almost like, this really simplified approach to learning all the things you need to do to be a top-level super successful leader and that apply to any different industry, not just financial services?” The answer is yes. That's actually what I'm doing right now, is breaking these complex strategies and Fortune 50 leadership techniques down in really easy implementable steps. And help individuals and individual leaders, as well as leaders of organizations in teams of people, implement these strategies to get great results. But what brought me to that point, it's interesting, I've always had a desire to do a little bit different and more and ultimately get to the point where I was impacting other people. And I had a great opportunity to speak at a conference back, I think it was the beginning of 2000 actually, speaking. In 2019, I had my first opportunity to speak at a conference that was outside of my company. And it was a national conference in 2018 and that was in front of maybe a few hundred people and that went very very well. It was all about leadership and what makes the top leaders. Then the next year, I was invited to speak on the main stage in 2019, you can see the video online. It’s with the top 3% of leaders. The 3% Edge is what it was called. And I spoke in front of 3,000 people. And I just remembered at that point it was like, wow! I was just energized. I mean totally energized. The feeling of stepping on that type of stage in front of that many people that are glued to what you're saying, and coming off of that stage to these great accolades and phenomenal feedback. Even today I was talking to somebody who brought that up, “Hey, you know that famous speech that you did at this conference?” That's an amazing feeling, and yeah it was a little nerve-wracking to get up there in front of these 3,000 people, whoa, is electrifying. 

John: 

And most importantly I had fun. I felt like I was really making this huge impact and people were leaving with something, and they left better than they came in, but I was also having fun. On stage, I felt like I just stepped right into my zone and it's amazing when you do

something you feel like that is just what you are meant to do and that is truly how I felt when I was on that stage. I'm thinking to myself, “This is what I meant to do.” And then shortly after that conference, I was invited, that was not a paid presentation. I was invited to speak and I was honored to speak, but then I was invited by a company to speak at their conference and I was paid to do it. Paid really really well to do it for an hour presentation and I thought to myself after that, “Wow! I can build a business doing this. Doing what I love. Absolutely love.” So that was when the wheels started turning very very seriously about this, probably in the middle or beginning of 2019, and it was in the back of my mind well before that. That's when I really started seriously thinking about it. When you find something that really energizes you, you can't stop thinking about it, you almost become obsessed with it ,and that's kind of what I was finding. I was thinking about it more and more and more and it was just pulling me toward that vision of doing that and just, I felt like not even standing on a stage literally but just figuratively. I felt like I was leading an organization, having a lot of fun, having success, but I felt like my figurative stage was bigger. I could impact more people and I wanted to impact more people in a bigger way. 

John: 

I’ve talked in past episodes about the importance of your eight people in any organization, and how they need three things in order for them to stay with you. If they don't have these three things, they are ultimately going to leave at some point. If they don't have one of these three things they are ultimately going to leave. First of all, they have to feel like they are growing. And to be honest with you in my role that I was in, I felt like I'd been there for 6 years at that time and I didn't feel like I was growing anymore. I felt like I was not as challenged and when you start to feel like you're plateauing and you're feeling like you've kind of kept out the growth that you can have in a certain role, that's dangerous. Secondly is that a person needs to feel like they are making an impact and really contributing in a way that they know they can. I feel like I was making a big impact in that organization but I didn't feel like I was making the impact that I knew that I could. There's a big difference and that was a big. It was eating at me inside. I knew I could do more and impact more people. And then last is feeling valued. I did feel value in the great organization, but ultimately those first two things were really missing so for me it was also an important realization. I remember, as you start to feel like you're pulled in a different direction and at the same point there's a lot of people out there that I know have have mornings like this, I remember a big eye-opener for me was it was a Sunday morning I woke up and I open my eyes and the first thought I had was, “Shit, I got to work tomorrow.” Literally that was the first thought, it was a beautiful Sunday morning outside. I have the whole day to do whatever and that's the first thought in my mind is, “Shit, I have work tomorrow?” That’s not good. That's a dangerous sign, big-time. Some of those who are out there, I know some of you because I've talked to you about it, that that's something that you're dealing with right now. That's because for only so long you can handle that stress, that frustration, and if you're doing something for the wrong reasons, ultimately it's going to eat at you. Now I had a great job. I was getting paid a lot of money to do something that I was good at and enjoyed very much for a long time. But again, those two things at the top, I didn't feel like I was growing and I feel like I can make a bigger impact. 

John:

For me, I started to really think seriously about making a change and more and more thought about it. I ultimately got to the point that you know what, this other thing is calling at me, it energizes me. The thought of developing other leaders. I wasn't even certain what it would look like to be honest with you. The only thing I really knew was speaking on a stage, so I'm like, “Okay, well that's cool. I can do that. Maybe my vision is speaking on a stage once a week for every single week, you know, for 50 speeches a year, and doing these big Keynotes, and all this kind of stuff.” And I'm like, wow that's amazing, all these places! And so I started thinking really serious about it. I started booking different events. I start, I got a TED talk that I was booked for in April 2020 to do. A TED talk. Wow, amazing, super excited! All these things started to happen which , to me, were signs of, “Okay, this is the right thing. I need to do this. This is my calling.” I also started thinking about you know I don't want to be 65 years old and look back and have regrets. There are tons of people that will sit down at some point in their life in a look back and they'll say, “Why did I do this? There are things in my life that I should have done 10 or 15 or 20 years ago. I regret not doing them.” And I never want to be filled with regret. For me at 49 years old I'm thinking, “Okay, this is my chance to start a whole new chapter in my life.” Was it scary? Yes, totally. Absolutely. I had an idea, I had a vision, but I knew that if I stayed in the current path for the wrong reasons ,which the wrong reason was i making a lot of money and in the top 1% of income earners, doing something I was good at and turning around companies. If ultimately you know you can do more and you know you can enjoy it more, and be just doing what you're passionate about, you have to figure out something. You have to make that move otherwise you're going to ultimately have regrets. 

John: 

What I thought about also, there's a question that I heard years ago and was from Brian Tracy. For those who don't know him he was and he is a motivational speaker and a time management expert. I learned a bunch of stuff by watching his videos and listening to tapes early in my career especially and there's a question he put out there that was really a baffle for me. And that was: what would I do if I knew I could not fail? What would I do if I knew I couldn't fail? That's amazing because it opens up your eyes to say, “Wow, okay, well there’s a lot I would do if I knew.” In fact, the reason often you don't do things is because of the fear of failure. Jim Carrey the actor, the comedian, tells an incredible story his father, Percy Carey, was as he put it the “funniest person on the planet” and other people corroborate with that story. It's not just Jim Carrey giving his father props and he was known he was not in the industry, wasn't in the entertainment industry, but he was known. Anybody that knew him knew him he was just this person that attracted people to him. He was the life of the party, was this unusually, unbelievably, talented comedic genius really is what Jim Carrey said. I mean, unexplainable he says as funny as he himself is, his father Percy was dramatically more funny. Significantly more talented than he was. Dad chose the more cautious conservative route and was afraid to try and afraid to get out there to really test his talents and go for what he really truly wanted. Instead, he took the more conservative way and was an accountant. When Jim was 12 years old his dad got laid off and they fell upon some really hard times. They had to really, really change their lifestyle and to the point where it was significantly painful. He watched for years as his father and his mom and he went through some really, really painful times and he saw what it did to his father and kind of sucked the life out of him. And he came to the realization, he said, “You know what? you have as much chance,” and this is a quote that he has and I’ll read to you, “You can fail at what you don't

like, so you might as well take a chance at doing what you love.” His father did something that he thought was a safe route. He hated being an accountant and he ended up failing in the end. He ended up getting let go so Jim, again, said, “You can fail at what you don't like, so you might as well take a chance of doing what you love.” And that's me really really says it all. 

John: 

So there's a couple things that happened. Fast forward to February 14th. I've mustered up the courage to take this leap. I didn't ultimately know what was going to look like, I really didn't. I just had a lot of speaking gigs on the docket but I knew that I could not keep one foot in and one foot out. That I could not do and build this business the way that I wanted to by maintaining my full-time commitment with my old company. I ultimately, on February 14th 2020, put in a call to my boss and said, “I am making a change. I'm going to plan to go off on my own, and here's what I'm doing. I'll work with you for a time and we'll figure out a transition.But ultimately I am making a change and I'm going in a different direction.” It was a really nerve-wracking call to make because once you make that call and you make that comment, there's no turning back from there. But wow, did it feel unbelievable and it was absolutely incredible. What was unbelievable to me is how freeing it felt to have done that and taking a major, major step, and sometimes you don't know if you're doing the right thing until after you've done it. Once I made that call and hung up that phone, it was clear that I was doing the right thing. I can't explain this feeling of overwhelming confidence. That I was doing the right thing. I was ecstatic! I called up my family, called everybody, and here's what I'm doing. Obviously words spread throughout all the people that I know and, you know, soon after that got all kinds of calls.And that it was a pretty major deal in my life and it certainly was a interesting piece of news for those people that had heard I made that big of a change and drastic of a change. 

John: 

That was February, middle of February, now if you are listening to this at some future point in time right now We’re at the end of 2020. We’re in the middle of COVID. The pandemic in early March. The whole country basically shut down. Restaurants, stores, everything. Everybody was in quarantine and what that meant was that every business now was facing a major change. A major change to how they did business. And the whole speaking business on stages, literally evaporated overnight. Literally. All of my speaking gigs from the TED talks to everything else that I had booked now in the course of literally about a week, cancelled one right after another. Everything I had spent time to build was gone in an incredibly quick period of time. I had just left, left my steady big paycheck, gone. I have nothing. I am now to the point of saying, “Wow, okay what do I do now?” I mean literally my whole business model was like, “Okay, I'm speaking, I'm supposed to be speaking. Now there's no conferences. How do I speak, how do I do this business?” I mean do I literally have to do something different, I mean I don't get it. I have to go back and then what I was doing that I was so panicked, paranoid, confused, frustrated, an emotional rollercoaster was immense. And did I question my decision at that point? Yeah, absolutely, sure. I mean there were people that asked me, “Would you have done it if you knew this pandemic was coming?” You know, it's funny at that time I'm like, “Duh,no, of course I wouldn’t have made the change.” at that point.And now at this point, all of my colleagues were now working from

home, which would have given me some more flexibility had I still been there. I would have been getting a good, steady paycheck and had flexible work from home and maybe build this. So I run through all this stuff in my head I'm like, I ask myself questions. “Why didn't I just wait a few weeks?” Literally. Because then I wouldn't have left. I'd still be there. I still would be getting income, I wouldn't have to worry about all these events being cancelled. Or why didn't I just work out a different, you know, ease out of this instead of just jump, you know why did I decide to do speaking? I mean, that all these kinds of questions in my mind that I'm like second-guessing everything and it really messed me up for a while to be honest with you. 

John: 

And I remember calling somebody who I had been connected with through a mutual friend who is in the speaking business, and very successful. I said I remember calling and saying,”Listen, man, you don't know me. I’ve heard lots of great things about you. Here is my scoop, here's what I just did. What do I do?” When I remember, he was like, “Wait a sec, what you just literally left a job, this great job, and you're now doing speaking?” I said, “Yeah.” I said, “I can't undo it. It's done. You got to just, what is it, what do I need to do, what are you doing?” I mean, honestly. And he said something that was really great. incredibly valuable he said, “Listen, speaking is not your business. What you're speaking about is your business. Speaking itself is just a delivery mechanism,” he said, “You know, your business is leadership, is helping people become better leaders That's just one of many many many delivery methods and it's just a matter of pivoting and going in different directions and still delivering everything that you're doing and and wanting to do just in a different format.” And that's what I needed to hear. I'm like you know what, that makes a ton of sense. I can do that, right? I can totally revamp, change this whole business. So I did. I remember hiring a coach that was into consulting. I didn't know anything about consulting with different companies and he referred me to somebody who was fantastic. I'm like, “Okay, I don't know what I'm doing here. I don't know what I don't know, so you've got to teach me in this business. I have the intellectual capital and the experience but I didn't necessarily know how to go about it. He was incredibly valuable and opened my eyes and helped me make some connections I started going down the road of saying, “You know what, hey, for years I've hired a coach.” I've had Peter Velardi on one of our episodes, or couple of the episodes, as my coach and that has been unbelievably valuable. I thought, “Why don't I do that for other people? Why don't I become an executive coach and work with the leaders and individuals to help them lead themselves and lead other people more effectively?” So, I started to do that, and that's a big part of my business right now is coaching. So two major parts of my business now which are consulting and working with individual leaders, is a whole part of my business and a very big part of my business that would not have necessarily been part of my plan or wasn't part of my plan back in February. But this whole pandemic caused me to think through things, things will be different. It caused me to do things I would have done without that. It caused me to go in directions that I definitely would have never gone in before and today I look back and I'm like, that was one of the best things that ever happened. I don't mean, obviously, this disastrous thing that has happened. But for me, it caused me to move the direction that has been absolutely fantastic for my business. 

John:

I do Keynotes now. I do presentations, so I’m not on the stage. I do them virtually and they are as effective, in some cases if not more effective, and they're easier for those who make things happen. So there’s a whole way of doing business now that I never I never would have proposed to somebody, “Hey, let me do a virtual keynote for your organization” prior to this whole pandemic. Now, I think a lot of companies are looking and saying, “Hey, you know what, it's an easy way to do it. It's obviously safe. It's logistically better and it's as effective.” There's as effectively as big, if not more ,of a return on investment for that organization. So there's a whole totally different business than I thought I would have when I made my jump back in February. So where I am now 9 months in, you know, this podcast was a whole new venture. I'm working with Kevin Palmieri who's my podcast coach and my producer of the show. Very instrumental in me kind of getting my podcast launched. I rememberTerry McMahon. Terry, thank you man, shout out to you. He and I were talking at the end of 2019 that you brought up podcasts and I’m like, “I don't know if I can do a podcast.” And he’s like, “Dude! You’ve gotta do a podcast.” He pushed me. Thank you, Terry. Kevin, I remember sitting down with Kevin and he actually introduced me to Kevin. I’m like, “Kevin, I don't know what I don't know. You gotta help me. This whole idea of doing a podcast and speaking into a microphone to a blank audience that I can’t see is uncomfortable. I'm used to speaking on stage. Speaking to a camera I mean, that's tough. How do I even do this?” It was a major comfort zone issue for me to even get started with this. I'll tell you he was patient. Kevin, I appreciate you, man. You were patient, you pushed me the right amount, and I never thought that I would do a podcast let alone be sitting here at episode number 100. And there will be a time where I'm at episode number 1,000 because I find it fun. I find it's very impactful. I hear from you, how impactful it is, and it's certainly something I'm really enjoying. Do I make money through the podcast? No. Now at some point I will as my goal in 2021 is to get some sponsors out there, but for right now I'm doing it because this helps build my brand but most importantly it helps provide some value, and to hopefully impact the people better listening to it 

John: 

I just think about how my life has changed. I took one step. It's interesting, a lot of times you don't see the things that you're going to see when you're sitting on the shoreline, so to speak. You see, before you taking that first step and I equate it to sitting on a beach before you kind of, you know, before you go into the boat and launch out in the sea, something like that. You have a different perspective. From the shoreline, you can only see out to the ocean or the vast you know lake or wherever you are. When you get out there, you start to see things you wouldn't see from the shoreline. You start to see all the spots and landscape and views you wouldn’t necessarily see. I think the same thing is true, without a doubt, in life. When you take that first step, there are things that now are visible to you and thoughts and ideas that you would never have had before, and that's what happened with me. I took that first step. I had no safety net at that point it was just, “Okay, I made the commitment. I cut the cord.” I’m now full time invested in building my business around helping other people. When you do that, ultimately you have things in a different perspective and things that come to you and ideas and thoughts that you wouldn't have had otherwise. I'm a big believer in that. I will tell you, I’m happier than I’ve ever been. I've never felt more at peace. I've never felt more energized. I wake up Sunday, I work on weekends and nights. Not because I have to, but because I love it. I love, truly love what I do. I love working with the people that I work with in the organizations and giving leadership advice. I love doing what I do and it started

with just taking one small, but incredibly significant big step, it started with a phone call and ultimately changed my world. What it allows me to do is realize, and I love Boston and Boston will always have a soft spot in my heart. I will always be a Bostonian, but at the same point I realized I've got family down in North Carolina. I want to be in warmer weather. I had a whole life down here that was waiting for me that I didn't realize, and I came down here, moved. and I have an incredible place. Walking distance from my twin sister and brother-in-law, niece and nephew. My parents are 3 miles away, my kids are down here with me, and we see each other and spend more time than I ever did in Boston. It is absolutely unbelievable how life has changed from taking that one step. So I thought for this 100th episode, “Yeah, let me tell the story,” you know? Yeah, there were a lot of times where I was wondering, “Okay, did I do the right thing? Would I have gone back ?” People ask me now and if I known the pandemic was coming, would I have resigned at that time? Looking back on it, yes. My answer changed. It’s definitely one of the best things I ever did. It was the best time for me to resign and start my business. I know it, Steve Jobs talks about the fact that you can't connect the dots looking forward, but we can connect them looking backwards. It’s easier to look back and say, “Wow, now that all made sense.” Yeah. I think I needed to go through something like that. I think I needed to be challenged really quickly early on because it caused me to go into overdrive in a good way. Caused me to pivot. And I think ,no not think, I know I am much further ahead now and this is now only you know 8-9 months into this, I am significantly further ahead now then I would have been had that all not happened. In a weird weird way that's what happened, so you're strengthened through this. You're challenged or pushed. When you step outside your comfort zone, that's where growth happens. So here I sit doing what I absolutely love. I'm in the process of writing a book, or I’m finished, with a book about to come out in the next two to three months. I am doing some amazing things with some amazing people and loving everyday. So thank you again for being steady consistent listeners. 

John: 

Again this is a big deal to be at episode number 100. I thought I’d share the story with you a little bit to give you an inside peek at how things have changed for me and pushed me to do this. When you feel you've got something out there that energizes you, that excites you, that you think about sometimes ,you got to just go with it. You got to take the leap and you got to have some blind faith sometimes. I think it's important. I didn't know exactly what this is going to look like and I still don't, but I know that I'm just getting started. I truly feel not only grateful for where I am, but excited about what's to come because I know I'm just getting started. I can't imagine what this is going to look like in 3 years let alone 5 or 10. I’ve got to tell you, it’s been a blast working with each and everyone of you. I enjoy talking to you. I'd love to talk to you directly, so feel free to reach out to me. You know how to get a hold of me. Direct message me and I'd love to hear your story. So with that, we’ll close out this episode. Again, 100 in the books. On to 200, 300, 400 up to 1,000. Keep liking, sharing, subscribing, put your comments down below, review. And by the way, subscribe on Youtube, because once we get past 100 we can have that as the official station or channel for this. Thanks again for listening, and we’ll tune in next time and I’ll share more stuff. Have a good day! Bye! 

John (Closing):

Thanks for joining us on today’s episode of Tomorrow’s Leader. For suggestions, or inquiries, about having me at your next event, or personal coaching, reach me at john@lauritogroup.com Once again, that’s john@lauritogroup.com. Thanks! Lead on!

Thanks for joining us on today’s episode of Tomorrow’s Leader. For suggestions, or inquiries, about having me at your next event, or personal coaching, reach me at john@lauritogroup.com Once again, that’s john@lauritogroup.com. Thanks! Lead on!

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